The angst over the the recent NBA player movement


The recent flow of money from owners, who are not very good business men, paying players, mediocre to excellent, a ridiculous portion of money, has been the talk of the internet the last couple days. None more talked about right now than Keven Durant leaving an excellent Oklahoma team to the even better Golden State warriors.

The angst and anger went off the charts….

This was the scene in Cleveland in 2010, after FREE AGENT  Lebron James took his talent to South Beach

I overstand that they also burnt Lebron James in effigy

And six years later, this happened in Oklahoma…

I overstand that they also hung him in effigy and shot up his Jersey

If we don’t see the similarities in this than we haven’t been paying attention

 

Eric Snow, player representative for the Cleveland Cavaliers, and Oscar Robertson

Not many modern fans know about Oscar Robinson and what he did for current NBA free agencey.

barra_flood.jpg

Or even worse the Curt Flood and how his fight for his Free agency freedom killed his career.

When Lebron James left Cleveland in 2010, his “owner” a man who made money off the backs of black people by giving them predatory loans, a man who is now buying up large tracks of property in Detroit in order to move black people out of the city….yes…that man, wrote a scathing and racist letter to him and posted it publicly.

But all was once again right on the plantation as Lebron James, a single child of a teen age mother, never really had a masculine man, in his life to steer him straight, decided to make boatloads of money for the same plantation owner that eviscerated him publicly, by reconciling. What is interesting in reading the kneegrow fan’s response to their favorite player leaving is to get out of your fucking emotions. Be a fan of the player instead of the team if you must. But you are the ones putting dollars into the pockets of Billionaires and watching them screw over your favorite athletes. Yet you don’t react to the owners doing this, as much as you do when the players make business decisions.

  • The average NBA team is now worth $634 million, up 25% from last year. As you might expect, the typical NBA team owner is a very wealthy individual. …
    The short list below breaks down four team that has been in the forefront of this money struggles between owner and players and the net worth of these owners.
  • Mickey Arison. Miami Heat. Net worth: 7 billion (currently debating if they should pay or let Dwayne Wade go, after making Miami a house hold name outside of Florida
  • Clay Bennett. Oklahoma Thunder. Net worth “north” of: $400 Million (who took the team from Seattle and intimidated the city of Oklahoma into paying for his arena.
  • Joseph Lacob. Golden State warriors. Net worth: $325 Million (who sells a team based in Oakland to predominantly white fans)
  • Dan Gilbert. Cleveland Cavaliers. Net worth: $4.7 billion ( a jealous Khazar whose effort to limit player movement was good, until he benefited from same player movement the best player in the game)

Remember when Dan Gilbert led a charge against Mickey Arison under the guise of ensuring that another Miami Heat “super team” would not be built again. Effectively hamstringing the Heat from retooling? Yeah! The same Gilbert that has to now pay $54 million in luxury taxes because he overspend to get a championship. Now that the new tv deal…partially paid for by YOU the fan…has kicked in, we now see the spending going out of control. NBA TV deal: How the new $24B contract stacks up against other leagues

And while the NBA Average Salary is $5.15 up till the recent spending, keep in mind the amurdikkka, everybody pays taxes. But professional athletes pay … and pay … and pay.  Pro athletes are not like your everyday taxpayer, and players at all levels get a piece taken from them in just about every place they visit. as Matthew Mulligan, Maine native in his seventh NFL season stated: “Don’t get me wrong, playing in the NFL you get good money. But you don’t even get half of it by the time the states, cities, the state you reside in, the agencies, (and) the union dues are figured in. All those things, you don’t take home as much.”

Known as the “jock tax,” it is additional source of revenue for states and a hassle for many athletes filing their first taxes. Yet many of us with minimum to middling salaries in a nation where the average worker still props up this failing system, we seek solace from this reality in being angry when athletes, visible members of the sporting scene make huge chunks of money for years of hard work and dedication and pain and damage to their bodies. While those wealthy owners who pay them are largely ignored.

Note than when largely white  players in Hockey, Baseball, Golf and Tennis, make shit load of money, the outcry is not as severe. Granted Golf and Tennis are individual sports, but if we think its not about race, than Floyd Mayweather and some of the knew jack black athletes shouldn’t be criticized as chasing money in a individual and brutal sport like boxing.

What a lot of NBA fans want is for the athlete to remain in economic bondage to their billionaire owners to satisfy their petty overly emotional attachment to bread and circus. A bondage of both physical and indentured servitude to owners, mostly Khazars, who continue to exploit us as much as their ancestors on the plantation.

Excerpted from a review on $40 million slaves

From Jackie Robinson to Muhammad Ali and Arthur Ashe, African American athletes have been at the center of modern culture, their on-the-field heroics admired and stratospheric earnings envied. But for all their money, fame, and achievement, says New York Times columnist William C. Rhoden, black athletes still find themselves on the periphery of true power in the multi billion-dollar industry their talent built.

Provocative and controversial, Rhoden’s $40 Million Slaves weaves a compelling narrative of black athletes in the United States, from the plantation to their beginnings in nineteenth-century boxing rings to the history-making accomplishments of notable figures such as Jesse Owens, Althea Gibson, and Willie Mays. Rhoden reveals that black athletes’ “evolution” has merely been a journey from literal plantations—where sports were introduced as diversions to quell revolutionary stirrings—to today’s figurative ones, in the form of collegiate and professional sports programs.

He details the “conveyor belt” that brings kids from inner cities and small towns to big-time programs, where they’re cut off from their roots and exploited by team owners, sports agents, and the media. He also sets his sights on athletes like Michael Jordan, who he says have abdicated their responsibility to the community with an apathy that borders on treason.

The power black athletes have today is as limited as when masters forced their slaves to race and fight. The primary difference is, today’s shackles are often the athletes’ own making.

In the chapter on athletic style, Rhoden contends it was through the development of a distinct and unmistakable style that African American athletes leveraged their status within the sports industry. The book is also deeply autobiographical. Rhoden himself was an athlete he played football at a historically black college, Morgan State University in Baltimore, in the late 1960’s. 

Rhoden argues that while black athletes are among the most famous and highest remunerated salaried individuals working today, this fact does not mean that they are in control of their own destinies. Rhoden is aware that his title, which suggests that even an athlete earning forty million dollars can still be a slave, is provocative.  Rhoden’s larger point and it is a point about race in America, not just race in sports is that the journey to full emancipation for African Americans is not yet complete. Using the analogy of the biblical Exodus frequently used by African Americans to describe their own quest for freedom, Rhoden sees the black athlete as still wandering in the desert, still finding a way in the wilderness nowhere near the promised land of autonomy and equality.

Rhoden traces African American athletic activity back to speculative roots in African culture and verges on suggesting that the intensity of sporting culture in the United States may hinge on this African American influence, although by using comparable situations in Australia and Canada one might argue otherwise. Rhoden gives a somber conspectus on how sports were used on slave plantations to give African American men an outlet for aggressive impulses that might otherwise have been turned against their oppressive masters. Even though sports, especially boxing, became a major avenue for black male empowerment, Rhoden argues that the roots of these athletic practices in the context of slavery should lead historians to think twice about whether athletics are automatically empowering and liberating for black Americans.

Rhoden makes another point relating to the history of race in America, noting that the path to racial equality has not been one of seamless progress; even after the Civil War there have been times when racism and white social control increased rather than decreased. (The political scientist Ira Katznelson made a similar statement in his 2005 book When Affirmative Action Was White.

I guarantee you that this recent anger and tears by mostly white people who likes to see a black man’s employment movement restricted, will subside until next year when Lebron James, Russel Westbrook and Durant (who has a one year out in in contract) hits the market again.

Until then, did you see the railroad cars filled with armored vehicles rolling through your neighborhood and cities over the last year recently? Yeah! Most didn’t because they were too busy watching sporting news.

4 thoughts on “The angst over the the recent NBA player movement

  1. “Provocative and controversial, Rhoden’s $40 Million Slaves weaves a compelling narrative of black athletes in the United States, from the plantation to their beginnings in nineteenth-century boxing rings to the history-making accomplishments of notable figures such as Jesse Owens, Althea Gibson, and Willie Mays. Rhoden reveals that black athletes’ “evolution” has merely been a journey from literal plantations—where sports were introduced as diversions to quell revolutionary stirrings—to today’s figurative ones, in the form of collegiate and professional sports programs.

    He details the “conveyor belt” that brings kids from inner cities and small towns to big-time programs, where they’re cut off from their roots and exploited by team owners, sports agents, and the media. He also sets his sights on athletes like Michael Jordan, who he says have abdicated their responsibility to the community with an apathy that borders on treason.”
    I love that book! I read it years ago and it blew my mind. Rhoden did great research for it. I agree that youngsters today don’t know enough about Curt Flood and Oscar Robinson. And what they contributed. The Durant situation is getting blown out of proportion. I admit it does look like a weak move to go to the team that eliminated you. But I think Durant has the right to make that decision if he wants to. He might’ve been a better fit with the Celtics or Clippers. But that’s not my call. The bottom line is that white people feel they own these black players. And they get pissed when you leave and become a runaway slave. I saw a video of this white guy calling Durant a coward and didn’t have the heart of champion. These people are insane! And Gilbert is a racist bitch for how he treated LeBron. James and Durant are grown ass men! And these white folks feel they are owed a certain amount of respect for “allowing” them to play in the NBA,NFL and baseball. They are all full of crap. Another great post comrade.

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    1. People say sports is business, but the way sports is set up, it is not like any other business. Sports are the ultimate example of the plantation mentality and for all those people who are offended that grown as men ( as you said) can decide their own future tells you al to about how amurdikkkka view black men with a mind of their own. My biggest contentions is how folly tricksters constantly allow these billionaires to build stadium in cities at tax payers expense. Cities that fail in other quality of life metrics. I only posted this, not because I care about any team, but I care about how much the savage and the kneegrows feel about the new era slaves. Amurdikkka still have a problem with black people ( black men specifically) making money

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Deep down they don’t think they’re worth the money. They resent that these black athletes get all this paper for playing a sport. Then get upset when they leave the team. They feel as though their slave has betrayed them.

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